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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 1630437, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1630437
Research Article

Difference in Subjective Accessibility of On Demand Recall of Visual, Taste, and Olfactory Memories

1Institute of Physiotherapy and Selected Medical Disciplines, Faculty of Health and Social Studies, University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice, České Budějovice, Czech Republic
2Institute of Anatomy, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic

Correspondence should be addressed to Petr Zach; zc.tsop@rtep.hcaz

Received 19 August 2017; Revised 22 November 2017; Accepted 3 December 2017; Published 10 January 2018

Academic Editor: Stefan Rampp

Copyright © 2018 Petr Zach et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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