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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 2472508, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2472508
Research Article

Second Blood Meal by Female Lutzomyia longipalpis: Enhancement by Oviposition and Its Effects on Digestion, Longevity, and Leishmania Infection

1Laboratory of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology, Oswaldo Cruz Institute, FIOCRUZ, 4365 Brasil Av., Leonidas Deane Building, Room 207, 21040-360 Manguinhos, RJ, Brazil
2Faculty of Health and Medicine, Division of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Lancaster University, Furness Building, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4YG, UK
3National Institute of Science and Technology for Molecular Entomology, 373 Carlos Chagas Filho Av., Center for Health Science, Building D, Basement, Room 5, Cidade Universitária, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to F. A. Genta; moc.liamg@odnanrefatneg

Received 9 October 2017; Revised 11 January 2018; Accepted 15 February 2018; Published 25 March 2018

Academic Editor: Marlene Benchimol

Copyright © 2018 C. S. Moraes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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