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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 5436187, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5436187
Research Article

Cytogenomic Integrative Network Analysis of the Critical Region Associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome

1Post-Graduate Program in Genetics and Molecular Biology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
2Medical Genetics Service, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2350, 90035-903 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
3Department of Pediatrics, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso (UFMT), 78600-000 Cuiabá, MT, Brazil
4Post-Graduate Program in Genetics and Biodiversity, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Ondina, 40170-290 Salvador, BA, Brazil
5Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade de Passo Fundo, Passo Fundo, RS, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Mariluce Riegel; rb.ude.apch@legeirm

Received 6 October 2017; Accepted 1 February 2018; Published 12 March 2018

Academic Editor: Hesham H. Ali

Copyright © 2018 Thiago Corrêa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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