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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 7212861, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7212861
Research Article

Heme Oxygenase-1 Activity as a Correlate to Exercise-Mediated Amelioration of Cognitive Decline and Neuropathological Alterations in an Aging Rat Model of Dementia

1Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary
2MTA-DE Cerebrovascular and Neurodegenerative Research Group, Department of Neurology & Neuropathology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary
3Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary
4Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Neuroscience, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary

Correspondence should be addressed to Béla Juhász; uh.bedinu.dem@aleb.zsahuj

Received 17 July 2017; Revised 24 November 2017; Accepted 1 January 2018; Published 30 January 2018

Academic Editor: Lap Ho

Copyright © 2018 Andrea Kurucz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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