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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 7497314, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7497314
Research Article

The CD40 rs1883832 Polymorphism Affects Sepsis Susceptibility and sCD40L Levels

1Translational Medicine Center of Sepsis, Department of Pathophysiology, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China
2Department of Critical Care Medicine, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China
3Department of Pathophysiology, Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Xian-Zhong Xiao; moc.621@2102zxxxdnz and Ming-Shi Yang; moc.621@smyxdnz

Received 30 August 2017; Revised 9 January 2018; Accepted 14 February 2018; Published 26 March 2018

Academic Editor: Ruxana Sadikot

Copyright © 2018 Zuo-Liang Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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