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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 8031213, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8031213
Review Article

Chromium(VI) Toxicity in Legume Plants: Modulation Effects of Rhizobial Symbiosis

Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Vasyl Stefanyk Precarpathian National University, 57 Shevchenko Str., Ivano-Frankivsk 76018, Ukraine

Correspondence should be addressed to Uliana Ya. Stambulska; ten.rku@akslubmatsu and Maria M. Bayliak; ten.rku@kailyab

Received 17 November 2017; Accepted 31 December 2017; Published 14 February 2018

Academic Editor: Jesús Muñoz-Rojas

Copyright © 2018 Uliana Ya. Stambulska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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