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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 8790283, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8790283
Research Article

The Effect of an Authentic Acute Physical Education Session of Dance on Elementary Students’ Selective Attention

1Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA
2The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia
3University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
4George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to P. H. Kulinna; ude.usa@annilukp

Received 5 September 2017; Revised 9 December 2017; Accepted 3 January 2018; Published 5 February 2018

Academic Editor: Senlin Chen

Copyright © 2018 P. H. Kulinna et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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