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BioMed Research International
Volume 2019, Article ID 3764354, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/3764354
Research Article

Psychophysiological Characteristics of Burnout Syndrome: Resting-State EEG Analysis

Institute of Applied Psychology, Faculty of Management and Social Communication, Jagiellonian University, Łojasiewicza 4, 30-348 Kraków, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Krystyna Golonka; lp.ude.ju@aknolog.anytsyrk

Received 17 May 2019; Accepted 10 July 2019; Published 29 July 2019

Guest Editor: Gabriela Topa

Copyright © 2019 Krystyna Golonka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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