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BioMed Research International
Volume 2019, Article ID 4789679, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/4789679
Research Article

Association between Herpes Zoster and Osteoporosis: A Nested Case-Control Study Using a National Sample Cohort

1Hallym Data Science Laboratory, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang 14068, Republic of Korea
2Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang 14068, Republic of Korea
3Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea
4Department of Urology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang 14068, Republic of Korea
5Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul 05505, Republic of Korea
6Department of Statistics & Institute of Statistics, Hallym University, Chuncheon 24252, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Hyo Geun Choi; moc.revan@nepup

Received 2 May 2019; Revised 1 July 2019; Accepted 17 July 2019; Published 30 July 2019

Academic Editor: Timo Gaber

Copyright © 2019 Chanyang Min et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. Chronic inflammatory disease might affect osteoporosis; however, few studies have reported the association between herpes zoster and osteoporosis. The goal of this study was to estimate the association between herpes zoster and osteoporosis in Korean residents. Methods. The Korean National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort, which includes individuals aged ≥ 50 years, was assessed from 2002 to 2013. In total, 68,492 osteoporosis participants were matched with 68,492 control participants at a ratio of 1:1 by age, sex, income, and region of residence. We assayed the prior histories of herpes zoster in the osteoporosis and control groups. The diagnoses of herpes zoster and osteoporosis were based on ICD-10 codes and claim codes. Crude and adjusted models of odds ratios (ORs) were explored using conditional logistic regression analyses, and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed. The participants were stratified according to age, sex, income, and region of residence. Subgroup analyses were performed to investigate the role of age and sex. Results. The rate of herpes zoster in the osteoporosis group (5.1% [3,487/68,492]) was higher than that in the control group (4.0% [2,738/68,492]). The adjusted OR of herpes zoster in the osteoporosis group was 1.17 (95% CI = 1.11-1.24). In the subgroup analyses, the adjusted OR was 1.34 (95% CI = 1.01-1.78) among males aged < 65 years, 1.20 (95% CI = 1.12-1.29) among females aged < 65 years, and 1.19 (95% CI = 1.04-1.36) among males aged ≥ 65 years. Conclusion. The ORs of herpes zoster were increased among the osteoporosis patients. This correlation was reliable in all subgroups by age and sex except group of women ≥ 65 years old.