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BioMed Research International
Volume 2019, Article ID 7315714, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/7315714
Research Article

Comparison of the Effectiveness of High-Intensity Interval Training in Hypoxia and Normoxia in Healthy Male Volunteers: A Pilot Study

1Department of Physiology, Academy of Physical Education in Katowice, Katowice, Poland
2School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Department of Lung Disease and Tuberculosis, Medical University of Silesia, 1 Koziołka St. 41-803 Zabrze, Katowice, Poland
3Department of Neuroscience and Imaging, Dipartimento, University di Madonna delle Piane, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Aleksandra Żebrowska; lp.eciwotak.fwa@aksworbez.a

Received 2 June 2019; Revised 7 August 2019; Accepted 5 September 2019; Published 22 September 2019

Academic Editor: Toshiyuki Sawaguchi

Copyright © 2019 Aleksandra Żebrowska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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