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BioMed Research International
Volume 2019, Article ID 9642589, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/9642589
Research Article

Expression Profiles of Long Noncoding RNAs in Intranasal LPS-Mediated Alzheimer’s Disease Model in Mice

1Department of Human Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Institute of Neuroscience, Changsha Medical University, Changsha, China
2Department of Human Anatomy, School of Basic Medical Science, Changsha Medical University, Changsha, China
3Medical College, Tibet University, Lhasa, China
4Department of Neurology, Xiang-ya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Jianming Li; moc.anis@1090gnimjl

Received 11 August 2018; Revised 23 October 2018; Accepted 30 December 2018; Published 21 January 2019

Academic Editor: Cristiano Capurso

Copyright © 2019 Liang Tang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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