Behavioural Neurology

Behavioural Neurology / 2006 / Article

Open Access

Volume 17 |Article ID 812760 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2006/812760

C. Jenner, G. Reali, M. Puopolo, M. C. Silveri, "Can Cognitive and Behavioural Disorders Differentiate Frontal Variant-Frontotemporal Dementia From Alzheimer’s Disease at Early Stages?", Behavioural Neurology, vol. 17, Article ID 812760, 7 pages, 2006. https://doi.org/10.1155/2006/812760

Can Cognitive and Behavioural Disorders Differentiate Frontal Variant-Frontotemporal Dementia From Alzheimer’s Disease at Early Stages?

Received10 Jul 2006
Accepted10 Jul 2006

Abstract

Frontal variant-Frontotemporal dementia (fvFTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients matched for severity of dementia at the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) received neuropsychological testing in order to explore if the dysexecutive disorder might characterise fvFTD at early stage, when AD is dominated by the episodic memory defect. We also determined if the behavioural syndrome was more severe in fvFTD than AD, and if specific patterns of behavioural symptoms could differentiate the two types of dementia, using the Neuropsychiatry Inventory (NPI). AD patients performed worse than fvFTD not only in memory but also in executive tasks. Apathy and eating disorders proved to be more severe or frequent in fvFTD even if the two groups did not differ in the total NPI score. CDR score significantly correlated with the NPI score in fvFTD and with the MMSE in AD. Our data confirm that the memory disorders may differentiate the two types of dementia; however, the dysexecutive syndrome is as severe, and even more severe in AD. The severity of the behavioural syndrome is comparable in the two groups but the nature of the behavioural disorders may vary to some extent. We conclude that AD dementia at early stage is a behavioural-cognitive syndrome, while in fvFTD the behavioural disorders appear when the cognitive deficit is still relatively mild.

Copyright © 2006 Hindawi Publishing Corporation and the authors. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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