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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 173073, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/173073
Clinical Study

Effect of Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Autism: A Randomized Double-Blind Crossover Trial

1Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand
2Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand
3Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand

Received 12 March 2014; Revised 12 August 2014; Accepted 12 August 2014; Published 30 October 2014

Academic Editor: Barbara Picconi

Copyright © 2014 Anuwat Amatachaya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC), and Children’s Global Assessment Scale (CGAS) after anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in individuals with autism. Twenty patients with autism received 5 consecutive days of both sham and active tDCS stimulation (1 mA) in a randomized double-blind crossover trial over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (F3) for 20 minutes in different orders. Measures of CARS, ATEC, and CGAS were administered before treatment and at 7 days posttreatment. The result showed statistical decrease in CARS score (). ATEC total was decreased from 67.25 to 58 (). CGAS was increased at 7 days posttreatment (). Our study suggests that anodal tDCS over the F3 may be a useful clinical tool in autism.