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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2014, Article ID 603134, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/603134
Review Article

Why Are the Right and Left Hemisphere Conceptual Representations Different?

1Center for Neuropsychological Research, Institute of Neurology Policlinico Gemelli, Catholic University of Rome, Largo A. Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome, Italy
2IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia, Department of Clinical and Behavioral Neurology, Via Ardeatina 306, 00179 Rome, Italy

Received 12 March 2013; Accepted 17 June 2013; Published 23 January 2014

Academic Editor: Stefano F. Cappa

Copyright © 2014 Guido Gainotti. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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