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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2014, Article ID 641213, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/641213
Review Article

Deep Brain Stimulation in Persistent Vegetative States: Ethical Issues Governing Decision Making

1Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Unit of Forensic Medicine, University of Verona, Piazzale L. A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona, Italy
2Department of Neurologic and Movement Sciences, Unit of Neurology, University of Verona, Piazzale L. A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona, Italy

Received 1 July 2013; Revised 5 February 2014; Accepted 5 February 2014; Published 16 March 2014

Academic Editor: Veit Roessner

Copyright © 2014 Sara Patuzzo and Paolo Manganotti. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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