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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 123636, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/123636
Research Article

The Neural Correlates of Spatial and Object Working Memory in Elderly and Parkinson’s Disease Subjects

1In-Vivo Human Molecular and Structural Neuroimaging Unit, Division of Neuroscienc San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 58, 20132 Milan, Italy
2Parkinson Institute, Istituti Clinici di Perfezionamento, Via Bignami 1, 20126 Milan, Italy
3IUSS Pavia, Piazza della Vittoria 15, 27100 Pavia, Italy
4Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Unit, I.R.C.C.S Hospital San Camillo, Via Alberoni 70, 30126 Venice, Italy
5Nuclear Medicine Unit, San Raffaele Hospital, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy
6Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Via Olgettina 58, 20132 Milan, Italy

Received 17 December 2014; Accepted 8 February 2015

Academic Editor: Jan O. Aasly

Copyright © 2015 Silvia P. Caminiti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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