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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015, Article ID 237436, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/237436
Clinical Study

Physical Feature Encoding and Word Recognition Abilities Are Altered in Children with Intractable Epilepsy: Preliminary Neuromagnetic Evidence

1Division of Neurology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA
2Milena’s Functional Brain Mapping and Brain-Computer Interface Lab, Florida Hospital for Children, Orlando, FL 32803, USA
3Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Center, Florida Hospital for Children, Orlando, FL 32803, USA
4MEG Lab, Florida Hospital for Children, Orlando, FL 32803, USA
5Division of Biostatistics & Epidemiology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45299, USA
6Pediatric Neuroimaging Research Consortium, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Research Foundation and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA
7Biomedical Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221, USA

Received 11 February 2015; Accepted 6 May 2015

Academic Editor: Francesco Pisani

Copyright © 2015 Maria Pardos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective evaluation of language function is critical for children with intractable epilepsy under consideration for epilepsy surgery. The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate word recognition in children with intractable epilepsy by using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ten children with intractable epilepsy (M/F 6/4, mean ± SD 13.4 ± 2.2 years) were matched on age and sex to healthy controls. Common nouns were presented simultaneously from visual and auditory sensory inputs in “match” and “mismatch” conditions. Neuromagnetic responses M1, M2, M3, M4, and M5 with latencies of ~100 ms, ~150 ms, ~250 ms, ~350 ms, and ~450 ms, respectively, elicited during the “match” condition were identified. Compared to healthy children, epilepsy patients had both significantly delayed latency of the M1 and reduced amplitudes of M3 and M5 responses. These results provide neurophysiologic evidence of altered word recognition in children with intractable epilepsy.