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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 352869, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/352869
Research Article

Melodic Contour Training and Its Effect on Speech in Noise, Consonant Discrimination, and Prosody Perception for Cochlear Implant Recipients

1Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
2HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, VIC 3053, Australia
3ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and Its Disorders, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
4SCIC Cochlear Implant Program-An RIDBC Service, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
5Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia

Received 24 April 2015; Revised 24 July 2015; Accepted 29 July 2015

Academic Editor: Kentaro Ono

Copyright © 2015 Chi Yhun Lo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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