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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015, Article ID 378726, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/378726
Research Article

Sleep Duration and Sleep Quality following Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Propensity Score Analysis

1Department of Emergency Medicine, Shuang-Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City 235, Taiwan
2Department of Emergency Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan
3College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan
4Department of Neurosurgery, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan
5Translational Research Laboratory, Cancer Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan
6Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan
7Department of Neurology, Shuang-Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City 235, Taiwan
8Department of Emergency Medicine, Shuang-Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, No. 291 Zhongzheng Road, Zhonghe District, New Taipei City 235, Taiwan

Received 10 December 2014; Accepted 6 March 2015

Academic Editor: Jiyao Jiang

Copyright © 2015 Ting-Yun Huang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has been widely studied and the effects of injury can be long term or even lifelong. This research aims to characterize the sleep problems of patients following acute mTBI. Methods. A total of 171 patients with mTBI within one month and 145 non-mTBI controls were recruited in this study. The questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), was used to evaluate seven aspects of sleep problems. A propensity score method was used to generate a quasirandomized design to account for the background information, including gender, age, Beck’s Anxiety Index, Beck’s Depression Index, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The effect was evaluated via cumulative logit regression including propensity scores as a covariate. Results. Before adjustment, about 60% mTBI patients and over three quarters of control subjects had mild sleep disturbance while one third mTBI patients had moderate sleep disturbance. After adjusting by the propensity scores, the scores of sleep quality and duration were significant between mTBI and control groups. Conclusion. Our study supports that sleep problem is common in mTBI group. After adjusting the confounders by propensity score, sleep duration and subjective sleep quality are the most frequently reported problems in mTBI patients within one month after the injury.