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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015, Article ID 525901, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/525901
Research Article

Effects of Different Types of Cognitive Training on Cognitive Function, Brain Structure, and Driving Safety in Senior Daily Drivers: A Pilot Study

1Smart Ageing International Research Center, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan
2Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan
3Division of Medical Neuroimage Analysis, Department of Community Medical Supports, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan
4Department of Functional Brain Imaging, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan
5Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo 102-8472, Japan
6Research Division 2, Mobility Services Laboratory, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Kanagawa 243-0123, Japan
7CAE and Testing Division 1, Vehicle Test and Measurement Technology Development, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Kanagawa 243-0192, Japan
8Research Division 2, Prototype and Test Department, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Kanagawa 243-0123, Japan

Received 11 November 2014; Accepted 21 February 2015

Academic Editor: Laura Piccardi

Copyright © 2015 Takayuki Nozawa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Citations to this Article [6 citations]

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  • Xinyi Cao, Ye Yao, Ting Li, Yan Cheng, Wei Feng, Yuan Shen, Qingwei Li, Lijuan Jiang, Wenyuan Wu, Jijun Wang, Jianhua Sheng, Jianfeng Feng, and Chunbo Li, “The Impact of Cognitive Training on Cerebral White Matter in Community-Dwelling Elderly: One-Year Prospective Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study,” Scientific Reports, vol. 6, pp. 33212, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Annette B. Brühl, and Barbara J. Sahakian, “Drugs, games, and devices for enhancing cognition: implications for work and society,” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Rui Nouchi, Toshiki Saito, Haruka Nouchi, and Ryuta Kawashima, “Small Acute Benefits of 4 Weeks Processing Speed Training Games on Processing Speed and Inhibition Performance and Depressive Mood in the Healthy Elderly People: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial,” Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, vol. 8, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Yoritaka Akimoto, Takayuki Nozawa, Akitake Kanno, Toshimune Kambara, Mizuki Ihara, Takeshi Ogawa, Takakuni Goto, Yasuyuki Taki, Ryoichi Yokoyama, Yuka Kotozaki, Rui Nouchi, Atsushi Sekiguchi, Hikaru Takeuchi, Carlos Makoto Miyauchi, Motoaki Sugiura, Eiichi Okumura, Takashi Sunda, Toshiyuki Shimizu, Eiji Tozuka, Satoru Hirose, Tatsuyoshi Nanbu, and Ryuta Kawashima, “High-gamma power changes after cognitive intervention: preliminary results from twenty-one senior adult subjects,” Brain and Behavior, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Miguel J. Hornos, Sandra Rute-Pérez, Carlos Rodríguez-Domínguez, María Luisa Rodríguez-Almendros, María José Rodríguez-Fórtiz, and Alfonso Caracuel, “Visual Working Memory Training of the Elderly in VIRTRAEL Personalized Assistant,” Personal Assistants: Emerging Computational Technologies, vol. 132, pp. 57–76, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Linlin Zhang, Yi Feng, Wenliang Ji, Jianzhang Liu, and Kun Liu, “Effect of Voluntary Wheel Running on Striatal Dopamine Level and Neurocognitive Behaviors after Molar Loss in Rats,” Behavioural Neurology, vol. 2017, pp. 1–6, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar