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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015, Article ID 565871, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/565871
Research Article

Language and Visual Perception Associations: Meta-Analytic Connectivity Modeling of Brodmann Area 37

1Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA
2Radiology Department and Research Institute, Miami Children’s Hospital, Miami, FL 33155, USA
3Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University, Davie, FL 33314, USA

Received 4 November 2014; Revised 9 December 2014; Accepted 17 December 2014

Academic Editor: Annalena Venneri

Copyright © 2015 Alfredo Ardila et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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