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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015, Article ID 580246, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/580246
Research Article

Abstract Word Definition in Patients with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

1Graduate Program in Speech and Language Pathology, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea
2Department of Speech and Hearing Therapy, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan 46252, Republic of Korea
3Neurocognitive Behavior Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 13620, Republic of Korea
4Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03080, Republic of Korea
5Translational Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03080, Republic of Korea
6Department and Research Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea

Received 12 March 2015; Revised 21 July 2015; Accepted 26 July 2015

Academic Editor: Camillo Marra

Copyright © 2015 Soo Ryon Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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