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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015, Article ID 638202, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/638202
Research Article

Musical Sequence Learning and EEG Correlates of Audiomotor Processing

1Department of Cognitive Science, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
2VA Northern California Health Care System, Martinez, CA 94553, USA
3Department of Neuroscience, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA

Received 24 April 2015; Revised 8 July 2015; Accepted 14 July 2015

Academic Editor: Shinichi Furuya

Copyright © 2015 Matt D. Schalles and Jaime A. Pineda. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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