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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015, Article ID 872487, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/872487
Review Article

A Proposed Neurological Interpretation of Language Evolution

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA

Received 17 December 2014; Revised 15 March 2015; Accepted 17 May 2015

Academic Editor: João Quevedo

Copyright © 2015 Alfredo Ardila. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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