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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2016, Article ID 5965894, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5965894
Research Article

Stress Recovery Effects of High- and Low-Frequency Amplified Music on Heart Rate Variability

1Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Tokai University, Kanagawa, Japan
2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
3Department of Rehabilitation, Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center, Chiba, Japan
4Graduate School of Core Ethics and Frontier Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, Japan
5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Tohoku University Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, Sendai, Japan

Received 10 March 2016; Revised 18 June 2016; Accepted 23 June 2016

Academic Editor: Enzo Emanuele

Copyright © 2016 Yoshie Nakajima et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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