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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2016, Article ID 6580416, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6580416
Research Article

Determinants of Noncompliance to Clinic Appointments and Medications among Nigerian Children with Epilepsy: Experience in a Tertiary Health Facility in Enugu, Nigeria

1Department of Paediatrics, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu, Nigeria
2Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu, Nigeria
3Department of Paediatrics, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki, Nigeria

Received 27 August 2015; Accepted 12 January 2016

Academic Editor: Ahmad Beydoun

Copyright © 2016 Roland Chidi Ibekwe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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