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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2017, Article ID 5238402, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5238402
Research Article

Effects of Acyclovir and IVIG on Behavioral Outcomes after HSV1 CNS Infection

1Department of Molecular Immunology, City of Hope Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, CA, USA
2Department of Environmental Toxicology, UC Davis, Davis, CA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Edouard M. Cantin; gro.hoc@nitnace

Received 12 July 2017; Revised 6 September 2017; Accepted 16 September 2017; Published 19 November 2017

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Biagini

Copyright © 2017 Chandran Ramakrishna et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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