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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2017, Article ID 5952897, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5952897
Research Article

Neuroprotective and Antiamnesic Effects of Mitragyna inermis Willd (Rubiaceae) on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

1Department of Biological Science, Faculty of Sciences, University of Ngaoundéré, P.O. Box 454, Ngaoundéré, Cameroon
2Institute of Mines and Petroleum Industries, University of Maroua, P.O. Box 46, Maroua, Cameroon
3Department of Zoology and Animal Physiology, Faculty of Science, University of Buea, P.O. Box 63, Buea, Cameroon
4Department of Animal Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, P.O. Box 67, Dschang, Cameroon
5Higher Teachers’ Training College, University of Yaoundé I, P.O. Box 47, Yaoundé, Cameroon
6Department of Animal Biology and Physiology, University of Yaoundé I, P.O. Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon
7Center of Medical Research, Institute of Medical Research and Medical Plants Studies, P.O. Box 6163, Yaoundé, Cameroon

Correspondence should be addressed to David Bougolla Pahaye; rf.oohay@eyahapdivad

Received 16 June 2016; Revised 21 December 2016; Accepted 10 January 2017; Published 12 March 2017

Academic Editor: Shyam S. Sharma

Copyright © 2017 David Bougolla Pahaye et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Aim. To assess memory improvement and neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of Mitragyna inermis (M. inermis) leaf decoction on the central nervous system. Methodology. Leaf decoction of M. inermis was tested on learning and memory in normal and scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in mice using memory behavioral tests such as the Morris water maze, object recognition task, and elevated plus maze. Oxidative stress enzymes—catalase, superoxide dismutase, and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, a product of lipid peroxidation—were quantified. In each test, mice 18 to 25 g were divided into groups of 5. Results. The extract reversed the effects of scopolamine in mice. The extract significantly increased discrimination index in the object recognition task test and inflexion ratio in the elevated plus maze test. The times spent in target quadrant in MWM increased while the transfer latency decreased in mice treated by M. inermis at the dose of 196.5 mg/kg. The activity levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase were significantly increased, whereas the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance was significantly decreased after 8 consecutive days of treatment with M. inermis at the dose of 393 mg/kg. Conclusion. These results suggest that M. inermis leaf extract possess potential antiamnesic effects.