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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 9318597, 5 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9318597
Research Article

Central Poststroke Pain: Its Profile among Stroke Survivors in Kano, Nigeria

Department of Physiotherapy, Bayero University Kano, Kano, Nigeria

Correspondence should be addressed to Auwal Abdullahi

Received 31 March 2017; Revised 24 June 2017; Accepted 26 July 2017; Published 19 September 2017

Academic Editor: Mayowa Owolabi

Copyright © 2017 Abdulbaki Halliru Bashir et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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