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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2011, Article ID 187624, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/187624
Research Article

In vivo Study of the Histone Chaperone Activity of Nucleolin by FRAP

1Université de Lyon, Laboratoire Joliot-Curie, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)/Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 69007 Lyon, France
2Laboratoire de Physique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)/Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 69007 Lyon, France
3Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire de la Cellule, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)/Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 69007 Lyon, France

Received 15 August 2010; Accepted 17 December 2010

Academic Editor: Anita H. Corbett

Copyright © 2011 Xavier Gaume et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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