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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 245090, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/245090
Review Article

Function of Membrane Rafts in Viral Lifecycles and Host Cellular Response

Department of Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Global COE Program for Innovation in Human Health Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8526, Japan

Received 3 August 2011; Revised 31 August 2011; Accepted 27 September 2011

Academic Editor: Brian P. Head

Copyright © 2011 Tadanobu Takahashi and Takashi Suzuki. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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