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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2011, Article ID 784698, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/784698
Research Article

Apple Procyanidins Suppress Amyloid -Protein Aggregation

1Molecular Gerontology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 35-2 Sakae-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan
2JAC Co., Ltd., 1-2-7 Higashiyama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-0043, Japan
3Asahi Breweries, Ltd., 1-1-21 Midori, Moriya-shi, Ibaraki 302-0106, Japan
4Ageing Control Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-1-3-10-201 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan

Received 28 December 2010; Revised 11 May 2011; Accepted 27 May 2011

Academic Editor: Sanford I. Bernstein

Copyright © 2011 Toshihiko Toda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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