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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2012, Article ID 105203, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/105203
Review Article

TCTP in Development and Cancer

1Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
2Wellcome Trust/Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QN, UK

Received 10 January 2012; Revised 24 February 2012; Accepted 24 February 2012

Academic Editor: Malgorzata Kloc

Copyright © 2012 Magdalena J. Koziol and John B. Gurdon. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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