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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 248135, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/248135
Review Article

Sphingolipid and Ceramide Homeostasis: Potential Therapeutic Targets

1School of Biology and Chemistry, Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, KY16 9ST, UK
2Biophysical Sciences Institute, School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences and Department of Chemistry, University of Durham University Science Laboratories, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
3School of Medicine and Health, Durham University, Queen's Campus, Stockton-on-Tees TS17 6BH, UK

Received 31 July 2011; Accepted 20 October 2011

Academic Editor: Todd B. Reynolds

Copyright © 2012 Simon A. Young et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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