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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 398697, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/398697
Review Article

Lipoprotein Lipase as a Candidate Target for Cancer Prevention/Therapy

Division of Cancer Development System, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan

Received 28 April 2011; Accepted 17 August 2011

Academic Editor: Terry K. Smith

Copyright © 2012 Shinji Takasu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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