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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2012, Article ID 454368, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/454368
Review Article

Complex Regulation of the Pericellular Proteolytic Microenvironment during Tumor Progression and Wound Repair: Functional Interactions between the Serine Protease and Matrix Metalloproteinase Cascades

Center for Cell Biology and Cancer Research, Albany Medical College, 47 New Scotland Avenue, Albany, NY 12208, USA

Received 31 August 2011; Accepted 21 November 2011

Academic Editor: Maria L. Urso

Copyright © 2012 Cynthia E. Wilkins-Port et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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