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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2012, Article ID 504906, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/504906
Review Article

Formation, Contraction, and Mechanotransduction of Myofribrils in Cardiac Development: Clues from Genetics

Institute of Genetics, Queen's Medical Centre, School of Biology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK

Received 20 January 2012; Revised 11 April 2012; Accepted 15 April 2012

Academic Editor: John Konhilas

Copyright © 2012 Javier T. Granados-Riveron and J. David Brook. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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