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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 786010, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/786010
Research Article

Protective Effect of Sodium Nitroprusside on the Rat Small Intestine Transplanted Mucosa

1Ultrasound Department, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200090, China
2Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated First People’s Hospital, Shanghai 200080, China
3Shanghai Institute of Digestive Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Medical College, Shanghai 200025, China
4Department of Pathology, Shanghai Jiaotong University Medical College, Shanghai 200025, China

Received 23 September 2014; Accepted 18 December 2014

Academic Editor: Andrei Surguchov

Copyright © 2015 Feng-Hua Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The intestinal mucosal epithelium is extremely susceptible to even brief periods of ischemia. Mucosal barrier damage, which is associated with ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and consequently bacterial translocation, remains a major obstacle for clinically successful small bowel transplantation (SBT). Previous studies have demonstrated a protective effect of nitric oxide (NO) on other transplanted organs and NO mediated intestinal protection has also been reported in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), NO donor, on graft mucosal histology and molecular markers of function after SBT in rats. We used SNP in different period of heterotopic SBT rats. The groups consisted of SBT, pre-SNP group, and post-SNP group. Interestingly, the pre-SNP graft samples exhibited less damage compared to the SBT and post-SNP samples. In addition, mucosal samples from the pre-SNP group showed higher Na+-K+-ATPase activity and higher levels of laminin expression compared to the SBT and post-SNP samples. The findings of the present study reveal that SNP given before graft ischemia/reperfusion injury has a protective effect on mucosal histology and molecular markers of function in the transplanted small intestine.