Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Critical Care Research and Practice
Volume 2010, Article ID 351638, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/351638
Research Article

Gasping in Response to Basic Resuscitation Efforts: Observation in a Swine Model of Cardiac Arrest

1Department of Anaesthesia, University Hospital Basel, CH 4031, Basel, Switzerland
2Sarver Heart Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
3Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
4Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
5Arizona Department of Health Services Bureau of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma Systems, Phoenix, AZ 85007, USA
6Department of Emergency Medicine, Maricopa County Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ 85007, USA
7Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
8Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA

Received 25 December 2009; Revised 8 February 2010; Accepted 9 February 2010

Academic Editor: Wanchun Tang

Copyright © 2010 Mathias Zuercher et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To analyze the effect of basic resuscitation efforts on gasping and of gasping on survival. Methods. This is secondary analysis of a previously reported study comparing continuous chest compressions (CCC CPR) versus chest compressions plus ventilation (30:2 CPR) on survival. 64 swine were randomized to 1 of these 2 basic CPR approaches after either short (3 or 4 minutes) or long (5 or 6 minutes) durations of untreated VF. At 12 minutes of VF, all received the same Guidelines 2005 Advanced Cardiac Life Support. Neurologically status was evaluated at 24 hours. A score of 1 is normal, 2 is abnormal, such as not eating or drinking normally, unsteady gait, or slight resistance to restraint, 3 severely abnormal, where the animal is recumbent and unable to stand, 4 is comatose, and 5 is dead. For this analysis a neurological outcome score of 1 or 2 was classified as “good”, and a score of 3, 4, or 5 was classified as “poor.” Results. Gasping was more likely to continue or if absent, to resume in the animals with short durations of untreated VF before basic resuscitation efforts. With long durations of untreated VF, the frequency of gasping and survival was better in swine receiving CCC CPR. In the absence of frequent gasping, intact survival was rare in the long duration of untreated VF group. Conclusions. Gasping is an important phenomenon during basic resuscitation efforts for VF arrest and in this model was more frequent with CCC-CPR.