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Critical Care Research and Practice
Volume 2012, Article ID 504096, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/504096
Clinical Study

Consecutive Daily Measurements of Luminal Concentrations of Lactate in the Rectum in Septic Shock Patients

1Intensive CareUnit 4131, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
2Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2730 Herlev, Denmark

Received 23 August 2011; Revised 31 October 2011; Accepted 29 November 2011

Academic Editor: Maxime Cannesson

Copyright © 2012 Michael Ibsen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In a recent study we found no difference in the concentrations of luminal lactate in the rectum between nonsurvivors and survivors in early septic shock (<24 h). This study was initiated to investigate if there are any changes in the concentrations of luminal lactate in the rectum during the first 3 days of septic shock and possible differences between nonsurvivors and survivors. Methods. We studied 22 patients with septic shock in this observational study. Six to 24 h after the onset of septic shock the concentration of lactate in the rectal lumen was estimated by 4 h equilibrium dialysis (day 1). The rectal dialysis was repeated on day 2 and day 3. Results. The concentration of lactate in the rectal lumen did not change over the 3 days in neither nonsurvivors nor survivors. Rectal luminal and arterial lactate concentrations were not different. Conclusion. There was no change in the concentration of lactate in the rectal lumen over time in patients with septic shock. Also, there was no difference between nonsurvivors and survivors.