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Child Development Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 638239, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/638239
Research Article

Does “Yummy” Food Help You Grow and Avoid Illness? Children's and Adults' Understanding of the Effect of Psychobiological Labels on Growth and Illness

Department of Psychology, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309, USA

Received 5 March 2011; Revised 16 May 2011; Accepted 15 June 2011

Academic Editor: Susan A. Gelman

Copyright © 2011 Lakshmi Raman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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