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Child Development Research
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 203061, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/203061
Review Article

Linking Early Adversity, Emotion Dysregulation, and Psychopathology: The Case of Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

1Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2Department of Psychiatry & Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada

Received 9 November 2012; Revised 16 February 2013; Accepted 11 March 2013

Academic Editor: Annie Vinter

Copyright © 2013 Lauren A. Drvaric et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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