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Child Development Research
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 763808, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/763808
Research Article

Examining the Relative Contribution of Memory Updating, Attention Focus Switching, and Sustained Attention to Children’s Verbal Working Memory Span

Communication Sciences and Disorders, Grover Center W 218, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701, USA

Received 25 October 2012; Revised 22 January 2013; Accepted 1 February 2013

Academic Editor: Cheryl Dissanayake

Copyright © 2013 Beula M. Magimairaj and James W. Montgomery. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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