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Child Development Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 706547, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/706547
Research Article

Preschool Power Play: Resource Control Strategies Associated with Health

Department of Psychology, Oklahoma State University, 116 North Murray, Stillwater, OK 74078-3064, USA

Received 14 January 2014; Revised 17 March 2014; Accepted 18 March 2014; Published 10 April 2014

Academic Editor: Ross Flom

Copyright © 2014 Amber R. Massey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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