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Child Development Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1709314, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1709314
Research Article

Type and Duration of Home Activities of Children with Specific Language Impairment: Case Control Study Based on Parents’ Reports

1Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, Clinical Institute, HUCH, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
2Vantaa Social Welfare and Health Care, Jönsaksentie 4, 01600 Vantaa, Finland
3Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, Clinical Institute, HUCH, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 20, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
4Institute of Behavioural Sciences/Speech Sciences/Logopedics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 9, 00014 Helsinki, Finland

Received 9 April 2016; Revised 30 August 2016; Accepted 7 September 2016

Academic Editor: Olga Capirci

Copyright © 2016 Sinikka Hannus et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Parents of children with specific language impairment (SLI) are advised to promote language development at home. However, it is not known if children with SLI differ from healthy controls in their daily activities. This study collected prospectively information about the home activities of the children with SLI and their matched controls by using parents’ daily reports. Participants were 20 matched pairs. The ages of children in matched pairs were from 6 to 8 years. During one week, parents filled in daily questionnaires of listed home activities. The observed time was between 5 pm and 9.30 pm each day and it was divided into 30-minute scoring periods. Parents of children with SLI reported more varying home activities and fewer activities of playing outdoors than parents of control children. Home activities with literacy or screen time did not show difference between the two groups, and neither did playing table top games. Parents of children with SLI did more overlapping choices when scoring home activities than parents of control children. Children with SLI seemed to spend somewhat less time with home activities that, in particular, may ask for language and social skills and collaboration with peers.