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Child Development Research
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1725487, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1725487
Research Article

Mental State Talk Structure in Children’s Narratives: A Cluster Analysis

1Department of Education and Psychology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
2NEUROFARBA, University of Florence, Florence, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Christian Tarchi; moc.liamg@ihcrat.naitsirhc

Received 22 January 2017; Accepted 12 March 2017; Published 21 March 2017

Academic Editor: Randal X. Moldrich

Copyright © 2017 Giuliana Pinto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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