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Child Development Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 4506098, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4506098
Review Article

Metasynthesis of Factors Contributing to Children’s Communication Development: Influence on Reading and Mathematics

Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to William H. Rupley; ude.umat@yelpur-w

Received 14 July 2016; Accepted 21 November 2016; Published 19 February 2017

Academic Editor: Elena Nicoladis

Copyright © 2017 Amber J. Godwin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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