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Child Development Research
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 6838079, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6838079
Research Article

Children Adopt the Traits of Characters in a Narrative

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Rebecca A. Dore; ude.ledu@erodr

Received 22 June 2016; Revised 5 December 2016; Accepted 19 December 2016; Published 5 February 2017

Academic Editor: Elena Nicoladis

Copyright © 2017 Rebecca A. Dore et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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