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Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research
Volume 2012, Article ID 383170, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/383170
Review Article

Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Down’s Syndrome: Relevance to Aging and Dementia

1Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders (iMIND), University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
2Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (CNLM), University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA

Received 1 November 2011; Accepted 13 February 2012

Academic Editor: Elizabeth Head

Copyright © 2012 Pinar E. Coskun and Jorge Busciglio. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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