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Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 717315, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/717315
Review Article

The Use of Mouse Models for Understanding the Biology of Down Syndrome and Aging

Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Denver, 2101 E. Wesley Avenue, Denver, CO 80208, USA

Received 30 October 2011; Accepted 6 December 2011

Academic Editor: Elizabeth Head

Copyright © 2012 Guido N. Vacano et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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